Historicising Modern Bisexuality. Vice Versa emphasises the nature that is universal presence of bisexuality

Historicising Modern Bisexuality. Vice Versa emphasises the nature that is universal presence of bisexuality

Initial Articles

Theorists such as Angelides (2001) and Du Plessis (1996) agree that bisexuality’s lack happens maybe perhaps not through neglect but via a structural erasure. For Du Plessis, this “ideologically bound incapacity to assume bisexuality concretely … is typical to various ‘theories’ … from Freudian to ‘French feminist’ to Anglophone movie concept, from popular sexology to queer concept” (p. 22). Along side Wark (1997) , Du Plessis and Angelides are critical of theorists such as for example Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Diana Fuss, Elizabeth Grosz, along with other critics central to theory that is queer their not enough engagement with bisexuality. Christopher James (1996) in addition has noted the “exclusion of bisexuality being a structuring silence” within much queer, gay and lesbian concept (p. 232). James contends that theories of “mutual interiority” (the theorisation associated with “straight” in the queer and the other way around) are accustomed to elide bisexuality (p. 232).

A typical example of the problematic nature of theorising bisexuality in queer concept is Eve Sedgwick’s (1990) mapping of contemporary sex across the poles of “universalizing” and “minoritizing” (p. 85). For Sedgwick, intimate definitions such as for example “gay” will designate a definite minority populace while at precisely the same time suggesting that libido features a universalising impulse; that “apparently heterosexual people and item choices are highly marked by same-sex impacts and desires, and vice-versa for evidently homosexual ones” (p. 85). Continuer la lecture de « Historicising Modern Bisexuality. Vice Versa emphasises the nature that is universal presence of bisexuality »